Available to Produce

 

Cover of Slut the PlaySlut – A One Woman Show

This is a challenging play full of great and funny monologues for women. Also a perfect one-act play for fringe theater, touring or showcasing your work.

Very easy to produce. Requires 1 chair.

Runs a little less than 60 minutes.

Originally produced by Far Fetched Productions at The Toronto Fringe Festival featuring Heidi Weeks.

4 stars!  “McFarlane’s script delicately balances humor with an urgent questioning of gender and moral codes in a hypocritical society — and delivers amply on both counts.  …  Highly recommended.”  Kamal Al-Solaylee, Eye Weekly (Toronto)

Strong and Unique Female Voice

Rarely will you find such a great female role that will allow an actress to show so many facets of her talent. Not only that, but this play reaches out to women to tell them a woman can express her sexuality in an open way that is fun, joyous and loving without having yet found Mister Right.   The play shows woman that following their heart and respecting themselves also allows for healthy physical expression with others.  The character of Matilda is charming, funny and compelling.

The play garnered great reviews for the women who played Matilda.  For example:

CurtainUp: “[Heidi Weeks] adeptly transforms from one character to another, creating distinct and believable cameos through shifts in physical stance, voice timbre and accent”

eye Weekly: “Performed with panache by Heidi Weeks”

Gay and Lesbian Times “well played by the versatile [Susan Hammons] who even shows off a lovely voice”

Time Out New York “Weeks portrays Matilda with sympathy and humor, taking us deep within her psyche

 

Includes Female Monologues for Woman

The play can be performed by an adult actress of any age.   Women of any race, look or size will work well for the character. In fact, in my experience, the more typically sexy the actor is playing the part of Matilda, the more difficult it is to win over some people in the audience and the more judgmental they will be.  This also works but will take special care to overcome the audience’s judgement of attractive, sexually expressive women.

The character Matilda should not be distractingly pretty and if the actress is, it would be best to play it down.  This said, the actress who originated the role is very pretty and it seemed to work.   Although it can work against the play, for instance one male reviewer was disappointed that there weren’t enough sexy bits in the play (there isn’t much opportunity to be overtly sexy) and found himself feeling ripped off.  (But in my mind karma will eventually get reviewers like him.)

Monologue Format

I wrote the play partially in an attempt to overcome what I least like about most one-woman shows.  I wanted to make sure the actress had lots of opportunities to perform a variety of things.   I wanted to make it physically interesting and most of all I wanted the story to mean something and not just be a talent showcase.

Fun and Challenging One-Woman Show

The character Matilda is a challenge. It requires you to consider your own position on sexuality. Also, most women are all too aware of the social stigma of being promiscuous.  Television media demands that single main character females have many sexual partners. Rarely do they show women worrying  about what other people would think IF THEY KNEW how many men they had slept with.  Since it is an internal battle, it is difficult to portray. The somewhat fantastical situation of the play allows us to explore and externalize the shame that many women feel if they act outside social norms that television simply can’t do.

Production Requirements

This female monologue asks the actor to play many characters and demands strong physicality and smart choreography.  What you save in money for sets will be spent in time, rehearsal space and excellent direction.

The director for a one-woman show is more important than at any other time. The director ends up being the second character for the actor.  This play is most fun when solutions are found through performance, not set, lights or props. Therefore, good experience with modern, eclectic theatrical styles is very helpful.

The actor and director must feel comfortable with each other since you will be discussing sexuality  a lot. Be sure to find a person you enjoy spending time with, trust, who has good comic abilities and who recognizes how deeply the underlying issue effects women..

Why The Title of the Monologue?

There is nothing overtly sexual about this play despite its title.  The title,”Slut”,  is meant to be ironic and beleive me, I would have preferred to call it something else.  I called it “Slut a la carte” in New York because there was a musical called Slut – the musical.   However, I would object to considering a substitute title if you felt there was no other way to get it produced in your area.  I would however not agree to changes in the script that removed the word.

Challenges You Might Face with Audience Members (and Reviewers)

The play was written for the regular women I meet everyday, mostly middle class, educated, urban women who have spent plenty of adult years single. The types of people I’ve had trouble reaching with the play Slut include:

It is important to remember that this is a play about sexuality and while the humor and story line of the play is supposed to help the subject, it still is a touchy subject.

Some well educated and active feminists consider the play too “light.” It’s true that “slut” is light and purposefully so. I wanted to reach the people I have met in my life who need to hear Matilda’s message. It is not my style or forte to be on the forefront of female politics, although I applaud those who are. Some of our most important activist can get a little impatient with the rest of us not being up to speed with their vision. Unfortunately, it is possible more impatience can be found in the world of theatre than within the general public.

People who believe in or live the lifestyle portrayed in TV shows like “Sex in the City” may not buy that most women still fear the social stigma of being overly sexual. They have a bit of trouble really feeling for Matilda’s prediciment. These type of people enjoy the play but aren’t captured by the message and also think of it as “light”

Ironically, there is the next kind of audience member think that Matilda’s actions are truly wrong and that Matilda is actually “sick”. I’ve only run into one person who felt that Matilda was a sex addict in need of help, unfortunately it was a reviewer.

Finally, there are the people (mostly men?) who come to watch a “Slutty Woman”. Some are disappointed because the play is purposefully lacking in titillation while others express how much they enjoyed the actress, how attractive and talented she is but miss the  point of the play.

Read an Excerpt, click here.

Purchase the play on kindle, click here.

Purchase the play from Original Works Publishing, click here.

Request Rights to Perform, click here.

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